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Federation of American Scientists

Federation of American Scientists

The Federation of American Scientists (FAS), founded in 1945 by scientists who helped develop the atomic bomb, is devoted to the belief that scientists, engineers, and other technically trained people have the ethical obligation to ensure that the technological fruits of science and technology are applied to the benefit of mankind. FAS is a nonpartisan organization with a mission to address strategic and nuclear threats, harness the potential of innovation, and inform both the public and the highest levels of government on sound science & technology policy. We engage scientists, policy makers, think tanks, and scientific societies to fulfill our mission. 37 Nobel Laureates sit on the FAS Board of Sponsors.

The Nuclear Information Project, which provides the gold standard assessment of nuclear forces around the world, is directed by Hans Kristensen. The Defense Posture Project, which has provided policy solutions to the North Korea nuclear challenge and is now turning to the study of the role of conventional deterrence in geopolitics, is led by Adam Mount. The Congressional Science Policy Initiative, led by Michael Fisher, promotes two-way communication to inform and educate Congress on complex science and technology issues, and to educate the science community on the workings of Congress. Led by Doug Rand, the Technology and Innovation Initiative is devoted to harnessing emerging technologies and smart immigration policies for advancing U.S. national security and economic interests. The Day One Project, a dynamic policy and talent incubator that transforms ideas on science & technology issues into actions and identifies personnel for key science & technology -related positions in the executive agencies, is led by Acting President Dan Correa.

Previous fellows have gained experience writing op-eds, leading their own project from ideation to report publication to engaging staffers on the Hill, and practicing their sense of actionable federal government policy on key science & technology proposals. Depending on their interests, Fellows will have sufficient opportunity to be staffed in one or two projects, pursue their own research, and work closely under the organization’s President. Their work could include research into nuclear issues or emerging science & technologies such as artificial intelligence and biotechnology. Fellows may participate in educational engagement with policymakers in congressional offices and the executive branch, or experts in other organizations in Washington, D.C. They would have a chance to work with a wide array of authors, from activists to venture capitalists, on an expansive portfolio of emerging science & technology policies. They could also help to build a network of scientists and engineers who communicate their research to policy makers, and/or work with project directors to develop memoranda, blog posts, opinion pieces, and peer-reviewed publications.