Biography

Herbert Scoville, Jr. (1915-1985)
Dr. Herbert (Pete) Scoville, Jr., a long-time nuclear arms control activist in both government and private life, devoted special attention to encouraging young people interested in arms control and disarmament issues. In 1987, the Herbert Scoville, Jr. Peace Fellowship Program was established in his memory to continue that legacy.

Educated in science and physical chemistry, Dr. Scoville began his professional career by working with the National Defense Research Committee, the Atomic Energy Commission, and the Department of Defense, where as early as 1954 he argued for a U.S.-Soviet Test Ban Treaty.

During his tenure at the Central Intelligence Agency from 1955 to 1963, Dr. Scoville was one of the original developers of the technology required for independent verification, an essential ingredient for arms control treaties.

From 1963 to 1969, at the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), Dr. Scoville developed positions on the Limited Test Ban Treaty and the Non-Proliferation Treaty and participated in the original planning for the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks.

After leaving ACDA, Dr. Scoville devoted all his efforts to promoting international peace and cooperation. He spearheaded battles against the MX missile, MIRVed warheads and the Star Wars program. He was a founder of the Arms Control Association and the Arms Control Project of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Dr. Scoville was the author of Towards a Strategic Arms Limitation Agreement, Missile Madness and MX: Prescription for Disaster, as well as dozens of articles and editorials. He was in constant demand as a speaker and a frequent witness before Congress on arms control and nuclear weapons issues.

The Herbert Scoville, Jr. Peace Fellowship Program commemorates Dr. Scoville’s lifetime of accomplishments and aims to inspire a new generation to carry on his work.