2009 Fellows

Jessica Anderson

Fall 2009 Fellow, Henry L. Stimson Center

Education: University of the Witwatersrand, MA Forced Migration, 2011
Tufts University, BA International Relations, 2008

Issues Covered: Peace operations and security sector reform

Current Activities: Anderson is a PhD candidate in political science at the George Washington University where she is completing her dissertation on international aid in Somaliland. She expects to receive her PhD in May 2017. She is also a 2016 Rosenthal fellow with the State Department’s Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor bureau. She has been conducting research and designing, implementing, and assessing aid programs in Sub-Saharan Africa for over a decade. Prior to beginning her PhD, she was a consultant for several aid organizations. She consulted with the South African Human Rights Commission to develop a conflict assessment tool, and with IOM and Oxfam/African Centre for Migration and Society to assess aid intervention. She also founded a startup that supports post-conflict peacebuilding efforts.

She received a David L. Boren fellowship to conduct her dissertation research in Ethiopia and Somaliland during the 2014-2015 academic year. She has produced journal articles, book chapters, and reports on conflict and post-conflict aid behavior, and presented this work to a range of academic and policy audiences. Her writing has appeared in outlets including Peace Research, CFR’s Africa in Transition, and Foreign Policy.

 

Matthew Buongiorno

Fall 2009 Fellow, Federation of American Scientists

Education: University of Texas School of Law, JD, 2015
Texas Christian University, BA Political Science, 2009

Issues Covered: Small arms trafficking and conventional weapons issues, U.S. arms transfers, and nuclear issues

Current Activities: Buongiorno is an associate attorney at the Dallas office of Locke Lord LLP where he specializes in complex commercial litigation and business dispute resolution. He advanced to the semifinals in the Duberstein Bankruptcy Moot Court Competition held in New York. He was a Semifinalist in the Thad Hutcheson Moot Court Competition and a Quarterfinalist in the Gardere Wynn & Sewell Mock Trial Competition. Prior to law school he taught high school math in Kailua Kona, Hawaii, as a 2010 Corps Member with Teach For America. He was also the director of the school’s Model UN program and took a delegation of 16 students to New York City for a national conference. He pursued a master’s in education from Chaminade University of Honolulu as part of the Teach For America program.

 

Lisa Putkey

Fall 2009 Fellow, Peace Action Education Fund

Education: University of California at Berkeley, BA Peace and Conflict Studies, 2008

Issues Covered: Nuclear weapons, disarmament, and human security

Current Activities: Putkey is a Peace Studies teacher at the Woolman at Sierra Friends Center, an alternative semester program on peace, justice, and sustainability for high school juniors, seniors, and gap year students. She completed a masters program in Peace Education at the United Nations University for Peace in Costa Rica and is working on her masters thesis on grassroots resistance to the Los Alamos National (Nuclear Weapons) Laboratory. She was previously the Youth Coordinator for Think Outside the Bomb in New Mexico. Think Outside the Bomb is a national youth-led nuclear abolition network that has organized several conferences, educating and mobilizing hundreds of young people to actively resist the dangerous and destructive nuclear cycle. She is also a member of the board of directors of Peace Action Education Fund and serves on the executive board as Secretary.

 

Cole Harvey

Spring 2009 Fellow, Arms Control Association

Education: University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, MA Political Science, 2013
University of Pittsburgh, B.Phil Politics and Philosophy, 2008

Issues Covered: Russia, nuclear weapons, and international agreements

Current Activities: Harvey is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill. He studies authoritarian regimes and electoral manipulation, with a focus on the former Soviet Union. He is working on a dissertation that studies electoral manipulation, authoritarian regimes, and new democracies, and teaches classes in comparative politics and international relations. He received an Off-Campus Dissertation Fellowship to conduct research in Russia (Fall 2015), a Summer Research Fellowship (2016), and a Dissertation Completion Fellowship for 2016-2017. For the next academic year, he will be a member of Royster Society of Fellows, which is “the highest honor that the UNC Graduate School awards to graduate students,” based on “superior achievement in graduate study, the significance of their dissertation research and their potential as future leaders.”

He was awarded a federal FLAS (Foreign Language and Area Studies) fellowship to study Russian language in 2012-2013. He was previously a research associate in the Washington, DC office of the Center for Nonproliferation Studies where he worked on nuclear nonproliferation issues. He supported the senior staff focusing on those issues, and primarily researched and wrote on nuclear fuel cycle issue, Resolution 1540, and international law and nonproliferation.

 

Adam Lichtenheld

Spring 2009 Fellow, National Security News Service

Education: University of California, Berkeley, MA Political Science, 2013
University of Wisconsin at Madison, BA Political Science, International Studies and African Studies, 2008

Issues Covered: Organizations and lobbying groups that are representing Iraqi interests in Washington

Current Activities: Lichtenheld began a PhD program in political science at the University of California, Berkeley in fall 2012. He is studying international relations and comparative politics and focuses on fragile and failing states and issues of post-conflict transitions. His academic interests are forced migration, civil war, and peacebuilding. His current research focuses on the use of population displacement as a tool of statecraft, political mobilization in “ungoverned” territories, and the empirical effects of peacekeeping missions and peacebuilding programs. He received an M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley in 2013. His master’s thesis examined the influence of social capital on the livelihoods of returning refugees and formerly displaced populations in South Sudan. He is a recipient of the 2014 University of California, Berkeley Graduate Dean’s Summer Research Grant that will enable him to work on a research project on UN peacekeeping and civil war termination with one of his professors, a 2013 and 2014 Charles and Louise Travers Department of Political Science Summer Graduate Fellowship, University of California, Berkeley, and a 2013 U.S. Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (FLAS) to study advanced Arabic during the summer and academic year He is a member of the International Studies Association and the American Political Science Association.

He was previously a Project Manager in the Afghanistan/ Pakistan division for Chemonics International, USAID’s largest implementing partner. As an international development specialist, he helped start-up and manage $100+ million USAID local governance, stabilization and private sector development projects in Afghanistan, in addition to a USAID Office of Transition Initiatives (OTI) program in Libya. He also conducted field assignments and assisted in developing technical strategy for proposed USAID-funded local governance, conflict mitigation and stabilization projects in Iraq, Afghanistan, South Sudan and the Philippines. He was previously an environmental policy reporter at Inside Washington Publishers. He is a member of the Society for International Development and Young Professionals in Foreign Policy.