Current Fellows

Spring 2017 Scoville Fellows

Jesse Marks (Stimson Center) is working with Aditi Gorur in the Transforming Conflict and Governance–Protecting Civilians in Conflict program researching regional solutions for peacebuilding and civilian protection in protracted crises in the Middle East and Africa. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from Florida State University in 2016 with a BA in Middle East Studies and honors in the major. In high school, Marks spent several summers volunteering in Jordan where he developed an interest in Middle East culture and language. After witnessing the effects of the Iraqi and Syrian refugee crises, he began working with resettled refugees in Jacksonville, Florida. At FSU, Marks served in the Student Government Association as senator for the College of Arts and Sciences and Secretary of Academic Affairs where he was awarded New Senator of the Year and Cabinet Member of the Year. His honors in the major thesis explored the impact of tribal identity in the modern Middle East. While at FSU, Marks continued his work with refugees by partnering with the Florida Office of Refugees Services to create a strong infrastructure for refugee resettlement in Tallahassee. His interests in American foreign policy, national security, and Arabic led him back to Jordan in 2015 on a David L. Boren Scholarship to study Arabic for a year at the Qasid Language Institute in Amman. He interned for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) Representative to Jordan, researching refugee movements from Syria to Jordan and Europe and with the Jordan Center for Strategic Studies where he researched the host-community integration of Syrian refugees in the Levant. Since returning from Jordan, Marks worked as a research intern with the Migration Policy Institute’s International Migration program and as an Arabic research analyst intern with Blue Path Labs, a private consulting firm. He has published articles on humanitarian, peace, and security issues with the U.S.-Middle East Youth Network, Huffington Post, and The Hill. He was raised in Jacksonville, Florida.

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JMarks@Stimson.org

 

Bernadette Stadler (Center for Arms Control and Non-proliferation) is working with John Isaacs on nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation issues including the future of the Iran nuclear deal, North Korea’s nuclear program, and Russia-U.S. nuclear relations. Stadler received her BA in International Relations from Brown University in 2016. As part of her senior capstone project, she conducted research on the Russian-Iranian nuclear relationship and wrote a paper explaining Russia’s history both of assisting and opposing Iran’s nuclear programs. While studying abroad in Almaty, Kazakhstan, she also conducted independent research on Kazakhstan’s unique, largely grassroots nuclear disarmament process. At Brown, Stadler was deeply involved in Model United Nations, attending four conferences, organizing three, and serving on the club’s executive board. As a staff writer for the Brown Human Rights Report, she wrote articles on topics including LGBT rights in Russia and emergency disaster relief. She also volunteered as a tutor for a refugee from Bhutan through Brown Refugee Youth Tutoring and Enrichment (BRYTE). Stadler represented the Brown University International Relations department at the 2016 Naval Academy Foreign Affair Conference on women, peace and security. Her conference paper on the impact of women’s education on natural disaster resilience was selected as a semifinalist in the conference-wide essay contest. She has also engaged with issues of international peace and security as an intern at the U.S. Embassy in Latvia, where she reported on topics including Russian propaganda, and at the U.S. Embassy in Morocco, where she worked on a number of projects to increase participation in the formal economy. She speaks French and Russian and is a native of Harvard, Massachusetts.

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bstadler@armscontrolcenter.org

 

Maggie Tennis (Arms Control Association) is working with Kingston Reif, Kelsey Davenport and Daryl Kimbal focusing on issues related to the U.S. nuclear security agenda and Russian nuclear force policy and modernization. She will contribute to Arms Control Today and work on the Arms Control Association-Lugar Center Bipartisan WMD Policy Dialogue Project. She received a double BA in Anthropology and Slavic Studies from Brown University in 2015, with Honors in Anthropology. She graduated magna cum laude and as a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Her honors thesis at Brown examined Russian Information Warfare (IW) through translation and analysis of Kremlin rhetoric surrounding the 2014 Russian annexation of Crimea. The thesis was awarded the Anthropology Department’s prize for “Best Thesis.” Tennis has studied the Russian language since age 10. She lived in Yaroslavl, Russia for six months in 2012. During that time she had the opportunity to visit Crimea, prior to the Russian annexation, where she became interested in post-Soviet European security issues. She volunteered as a tutor and counselor at the YMCA in Yaroslavl. Tennis served as the Opinions Editor of the Brown Daily Herald and has published columns in The Herald, the Huffington Post and The Baltimore Sun. Her recent articles in The Sun have focused on Russia and Syria. She was a commencement speaker at Brown, and helped found the Student Power Initiative, which advocated successfully for greater student representation on the Brown University Corporation. She also received the Brown University Pembroke Center Undergraduate Fellowship to conduct research on Ukrainian language politics. She produced reports on pro-Russian language propaganda in Ukraine, as well as the role of the Ukrainian education system in cultivating Ukrainian nationalism. Most recently, Tennis worked at T. Rowe Price, an asset management company in Baltimore, MD. She grew up in Baltimore. She enjoys singing, especially folk and Shape Note singing, as well as reading, hiking and traveling.

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maggie@armscontrol.org